Aerosol Cloud Interactions and Regimes in the Southern Ocean

Closed and open cellular boundary layer organization in the Southern Ocean (-50.5N, -142.5E) on August 26, 2013
Closed and open cellular boundary layer organization in the Southern Ocean (-50.5N, -142.5E) on August 26, 2013

 

In this case from the Southern Ocean, the boundary layer mesoscale organization exhibits intermingled regions of closed and open MSc cells. In Worldview, examining the evolution of this airmass over hours (rocking between Terra and Aqua overpasses) or days shows a slow, quasi-equilibrium evolution in the relative areal coverage of closed and open cells. This mix of boundary layer organization in the cloud field is first observable on  July 18th, when the airmass lies just south of New Zealand at -50.5N, 180.0E. With relatively little disturbance, the boundary layer air advects eastward over the next two weeks, always containing a mixture of both closed and open cell regions.

The persistence of regions of both closed and open cells under what would seem to be relatively homogeneous large-scale meteorological forcing is suggestive of the bi-stability of marine boundary layer organization, first suggested by Baker and Charlson (1990). While still not fully understood, the quasi-equilibrium between adjacent regions of closed and open cells likely results from feedbacks among aerosols, cloud microphysics, precipitation, and cloud-top entrainment, as examined in Berner et al. (2013).

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